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Federal Programs and Grants Development Services

    • Federal Programs & Grants Development
    Title I is designed to ensure that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain an education of the highest quality and reach, at a minimum, proficiency on challenging state achievement standards and state assessments.
    According to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (NCLB), a school is eligible to become a Title I school when the poverty level, determined by free and reduced lunch counts, is at or above 40%.
    Under the law, schools above the 75% poverty rate must be serviced under the Title I project. Schools below the 75% poverty rate are ranked, then served in order until the funds run out. Currently, Volusia serves schools above the 40% poverty rate only.
    A school-wide program is designed with the knowledge that there is a link between poverty and low achievement; therefore, when there are large numbers of disadvantaged students, interventions will be more successful when they are implemented "school wide." Schools have flexibility in the use of Title I funds and in the delivery of services. Staff paid with Title I funds are free to work with all students in the building since there are no students identified as "Title I." The school works together to develop its curriculum and instruction to raise the achievement of all students.

    Our Mission Statement 

    Through service and leadership, we will ensure fair and equal opportunities for school communities to attain a high-quality education.
    Goal 1:
    Close the achievement gap for students in Title I schools as compared to those in non-Title I schools.
    Goal 2:
    Provide service-oriented support and resources to school communities.
    Goal 3:
    Increase collaboration with other departments.
    Goal 4:
    Promote life-long learning.
    The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), or the Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), was signed into law on January 8, 2002. It represents the most significant changes to educational policy in the last 35 years. The new law expands the role of the federal government in K-12 education and focuses on four principals: 
    • expanded options for parents
    • increased accountability for results
    • instruction based on proven educational methods
    • increased flexibility and local control
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